PHILIPPA GREGORY THE LADY OF THE RIVERS PDF

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I discovered the character of Jacquetta when I was working on the history of her daughter, Elizabeth Woodville, who made her extraordinary secret marriage to. The Lady of the Rivers by Philippa Gregory - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. #1 New York Times bestselling author. Get Free Read & Download Files Philippa Gregory The Lady Of The Rivers PDF. PHILIPPA GREGORY THE LADY OF THE RIVERS. Download: Philippa.


Philippa Gregory The Lady Of The Rivers Pdf

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Philippa Gregory The Lady Of The Rivers - [Free] Philippa Gregory The Lady Of The Rivers. [PDF] [EPUB] Philippa Gregory (born 9 January. The lady or The Tiger PDF - By Frank R. Stockton (FREE the lady of the rivers a novel 15 disks The Lady of the Rivers by Philippa Gregory (PDF). The Lady of. #1 New York Times bestselling author and “queen of royal fiction” (USA TODAY) Philippa Gregory brings to life the story of Jacquetta, Duchess of Bedford.

Perhaps Gregory is so popular now, that she took away much of the magic so evident in some of her earlier works to reach a wider audience. The theme of my complaints against The Lady of the Rivers is the lack of depth. Admittedly, thi I have a problem with authors thinking that they have to reach a larger mass audience once they are popular. Admittedly, this novel is a fast page-turner but solely because it is easy to read and has very short chapters several were only one page ; and not because it is overly intriguing or capturing.

Is it a coincidence that the latter part of the book is more interesting and not as sparse when describing the battles? Not at all. Sadly, even the events which were described appeared glossed over which relates back to the lack of depth element. Although Jacquetta is the main character, her character development is extremely weak, to say the least.

Her inner feelings and actions never felt fully disclosed and understood, making her seem very one-dimensional. Moreover, many of the other female characters also felt very demeaned and ill-described.

Joan of Arc was portrayed quite foolishly and Margaret of Anjou was even more annoying than usual. In The Lady of the Rivers, she just comes off as a spoiled teenager in a teen film. Plus, more of the book was about Margaret of Anjou than Jacquetta. I found this all to be disappointing because none of the characters were likable or encouraged support. Imagine a star-studded ensemble cast in a movie but with a terrible plot and poor acting.

That is the best way to describe this book. Sadly, even the proposed highlights were unsatisfying. I have to admit, there were SOME strong points throughout but I have to judge the novel on the whole, and overall, the momentous events covered Hundred Years War, Wars of the Roses were barely even scraped in potential by Gregory.

The Lady of the Rivers is more of a summary of these events or YA novel. Some contradictory points were also evident. For example: Um… sure. Jacquetta surely did in this novel. This bothered me. The end of the book was the best, similarly to how the Battle of Bosworth scene at the end of The Red Queen was surely the highlight and climax. It also set the lead-in to The White Queen quite seamlessly, especially if one would want to re-read it after The Lady of the Rivers.

However, Gregory should have instead transversed this as a novel about Margaret of Anjou, then. I do support the effort, however. Overall, not AS terrible as I suspected but definitely a dummied down version. View all 26 comments. Jan 17, Sean Barrs the Bookdragon rated it it was ok Shelves: Sometimes she does what she does extraordinarily well, and sometimes she writes crap like this.

I really struggled with this one. This way another perspective of the wars would have been covered. I want more Margaret! Give me more Margaret! But, it was all too vague. This resulted in a disappointing dynamic.

It was a little bit weird. This just needed more Margaret of Anjou.

I think it would have been incredibly interesting to see how she interpreted the events, and that way I think we would have had a fairly overall picture of the war. So far, York and the Tudor faction of the house of Lancaster have had their story told. But, Margaret of Anjou remains a quiet bystander to the events.

Where is her voice? Where is her tale? Her minor part in this novel was not enough; this novel was not enough to establish her presence in this series. A weak story when Margaret went This book was also, undoubtedly, too long.

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Some of the chapters were packed out and far too long, the opening was terrible; it was the worse beginning in the series.

The romance was okay. It felt secretive and at the same time realistic. I wanted to see the Cousins War, the Wars of the Roses, and how it affected the lives of the overlooked women in positions of power and persuasion. This was, definitely, the bad egg in this series. I just felt that there was far too much wrong with this book for me to enjoy it. It lacked a lot of the politics, and conniving characters of the previous two books. It also lacked any sense of narrative drive; I had no real reason to carry on reading this after Margret left the scene.

This was too unlike the rest of the series for it to feel like it was actually part of the series. The Cousin's War Series 1. The White Queen- A strong four stars 2. The Red Queen- A fair three stars 3. The Lady of the Rivers- A Margaretless two stars View all 9 comments.

Auch unsere Protagonistin Jacquetta fand ich mehr als sympathisch und absolut rational in ihrem Handeln. Sep 06, Misfit rated it it was ok Shelves: After Joan meets her unhappy end, the beauteous Jacquetta catches the eye of the powerful Duke of Bedford, uncle to young king Henry VI. Jacquetta's worries about being ravished by her older husband come to naught as he's more interested in using Jacquetta's virginal qualities to aid his experiments - experiments that have something to do with alchemy, the philosopher's stone and the unicorn.

If you are scratching your head over this, rest assured I was doing the same thing.

I didn't understand it then and I don't understand it now. Her older husband eventually dies and Jacquetta waits for the King's councilers to choose another husband after her year of mourning. John's squire Richard Woodville has other ideas, and Jacquetta is willing to risk the king's wrath for the sake of true love.

The marriage is a fruitful one and Jacquetta spends lots of time in the country producing one baby after another yawn. The wheel of fortune spins again when the king marries Margaret of Anjou and Jacquetta is summoned to serve the new Queen, but that marriage isn't exactly smooth sailing, and one thing leads to another until a little dispute erupts between the houses of Lancaster and York.

That's about as much plot summary you'll get from me, I'd rather discuss the reading experience, starting with the repetitive text. There are times when nothing much happens in Jacquetta and Richard's lives making babies, cooling heels in Calais for a year waiting for the king to do something , and it would have served the story better just to fast forward a few years with a brief mention rather than more tedious detail on what isn't happening.

I don't understand the great need to repeat same words three times in a single sentence, over and over and over again can't quote examples from the ARC, sorry. Any time Jacquetta mentions her first husband in a conversation he is always my Lord John, Duke of Bedford.

Margaret will mention her uncle in a conversation with an intimate friend as my uncle, the king of France I think everyone at court would know that she was niece to the king of France. Every time. I got it the first time, and did not need to be clubbed over the head with it: Instead of filling us in on the politics and intrigues of the court that caused these wars, we get endless exposition on the court on progress, as well as how Edmund Beaufort Duke of Somerset dotes on Margaret of Anjou, bringing her all those sweet little presents.

All in all, a very disappointing read and not one I'd recommend for those wanting more background and insight into the Wars of the Roses - there are much better choices out there with Penman's fabulous Sunne in Splendor still being the gold standard. Library only, then download it if you love it. Two stars. View all 56 comments. Dec 14, Jane rated it really liked it Shelves: Where I got the book: Philippa Gregory takes a step back farther in time with The Lady of the Rivers; after exploring the lives of the various Tudor women in a succession of novels, she now dives into the rich and complicated history of the Wars of the Roses.

This was a period in the s in which two branches of the Plantagenet royal family struggled for power over England and various bits of France. The protagonist in The Lady of the Rivers is Jacquetta of Luxembourg, who is not generally a well-known historical figure.

The story covers Jacquetta's life from adolescence to middle age, and Gregory fans will realize that it ends with the beginning of Gregory's novel The White Queen. I've been critical of Gregory's kings-and-queens novels in the past, mostly because I would like to see more pure fiction from her, but I enjoyed The Lady of the Rivers.

As usual, though, I did not find the protagonist particularly interesting; I felt that she was an observer of history rather than being a participant in it. Of course, in those days a noblewoman's role was to run the house and lands while the men fought Jacquetta does plenty of that and produce children Jacquetta had sixteen.

So maybe the impression of passivity that I received was due to the necessity of sticking fairly close to historical fact. The bits of white magic that all of Gregory's heroines inevitably indulge in do not come across as exciting enough to compensate me for the lack of action.

And yet there were some definite improvements over recent novels in the series. For one thing, Jacquetta gets to travel around quite a bit, and even though she's not in the battles I did get a better sense of being near to the action than I usually do.

There were several other memorable characters; in fact, I now understand the Wars of the Roses a whole lot better. So if you read historical fiction for the history, you'll be satisfied. I'm not going to say much about Gregory's writing idiosyncracies here, since what I was reading was a galley which had not even been edited for capitalization and paragraph layout; that surprised me. I desperately want to send her the gift of a big bag of semicolons, though.

Gregory is the undisputed queen of the comma splice. One last comment; I have been reading Gregory for years, and am fascinated to note that the novels are getting less sensual as time goes on.

This one was PG-rated. Overall impression: View all 12 comments.

Philippa Gregory

May 17, B the BookAddict rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Historical fiction, Tudor history lovers. I'm a sucker for that poem! My only grizzle is that being numbered Cousins War 3, you would think that it would be following in a chronological sense after The White Queen and The Red Queen but this is not so. Currently, the chronological order that these books should be read in is: BUT - The books are numbered and show on Goodreads in publication order. I didn't like leaping all over the place in time.

Personally, I'd have liked to read the damn series in order! Be warned about this anomaly if you haven't read this really interesting and entertaining series by Ms P Gregory yet. You could not have kept me at a royal court in England in the 15th and 16th century for all the money in the world.

I like my head just where it is - planted very firmly on my shoulders, thank you very much. Aug 26, Michele rated it it was ok.

I've enjoyed a small handful of Philippa Gregory novels in the past and the subject of her newest book entitled The Lady of the Rivers, the third in her Plantagenet women series, is Jaquetta of Luxembourg and mother to Elizabeth Woodville subject of a previous novel, The White Queen. There were a lot of allusions to witch-craft, I've enjoyed a small handful of Philippa Gregory novels in the past and the subject of her newest book entitled The Lady of the Rivers, the third in her Plantagenet women series, is Jaquetta of Luxembourg and mother to Elizabeth Woodville subject of a previous novel, The White Queen.

You can expect more and more of the same in The Lady of the Rivers. The story follows Jacquetta from a young teenaged girl who befriends Joan of Arc through her brief marriage to the Duke of Bedford and subsequent love match with Richard Woodville later made Earl of Rivers and the production of their 16! Why only two stars? After all, the subject matter excluding the supernatural bits is fascinating stuff. Jacquetta was one interesting and powerful lady.

The two stars comes from the writing. I'm not sure if Gregory is thinking that her readers are new to historical fiction and therefore likely to become confused about the characters, their relationship to one another and their respective titles or if the editor fell asleep on the job. But the end result is that every time a character is mentioned, either in dialog or in the text, we are told their name, title and relationship.

Over and over and over again. It makes reading the text of the novel a repetitious bore. For example one of many, many, many , Jacquetta speaking to Margaret of Anjou, whom she has served for years and years as a lady-in-waiting and therefore is very close friends with: She doesn't need to be reminded of his title. And of course Margaret very well knows that her close friend's first husband was the Duke of Bedford, for heaven's sake!

But alas, they didn't. So the end result is stilted dialog you don't need to reference your brother-in-laws title when speaking to your husband Even if you don't care for the supernatural stuff the Duke of Bedford, Gregory imagines here, marries Jacquetta for her witchy-talents , the novel could have been far better with a little editing.

Philippa Gregory

View all 10 comments. Aug 13, Sara rated it it was amazing Shelves: Hands down, Philippa Gregory is my favorite English historical novelist. She brings the era she is exploring to life and always tells the story from such a personal point of view that you feel you are, or at least know, the main character.

I also love that she takes historical women who have been literally overlooked by historians and brings their stories, their stuggles, into the light. Jacquetta is a fascinating person, wise and true and regal. She is a direct descendant of Melusina, the water goddess of legend, and this lineage gives her some powers that separate her from the everyday people around her.

This aspect of the story is handled beautifully and without anything that makes it seem preposterous or unrealistic.

If there is anything more interesting or captivating and sometimes more confusing than the British royal house during the Wars of the Roses and the Tudor eras, I do not know what it would be.

Like some of her characters, she practices alchemy, she spins gold from paper pages. I am gradually working my way through her canon, and having read them completely out of order, I keep wanting to begin at the beginning and read them chronologically. If God grants me the time, I will not grudge starting over. They are well-worth a second read.

The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels by Philippa Gregory (PDF)

View all 8 comments. I was really looking forward to reading this and was tragically disappointed. This was my first Philippa Gregory novel. She's written so many that I'm keen to read, as I'm fascinated by this era of history, and this was recommended as the best one to start with, so that I can read the series' chronologically.

I think maybe that was a mistake. I feel like this is more of a supplementary novel, more entertaining for those who know what comes later. This story dragged so much for me, and I just wasn' I was really looking forward to reading this and was tragically disappointed. This story dragged so much for me, and I just wasn't invested. Firstly, it took over pages just to get to the plot described in the blurb.

Then it was a tedious cycle: Baby - war - baby - war And then the wars are so repetitive, and back and forth, and the way that it's all told just makes it so bland. Margaret is a horrible person, and I mostly despised her. I really felt like Jacquetta and Richard were on the wrong side the entire time.

They're fighting for terrible people, and I get that, but it's such a stated fact, there's no emotional investment so you kinda just question why? I think the way the story is written in first person, present tense, made it completely emotionless. I felt nothing throughout this entire novel. I didn't really care who lived or died, what cities were lost or won I wanted characters that I could really root for and admire and there were none to be found.

Overall, I'm glad to be done with this because it was just a massive disappointment. I'll continue reading the series, but I'm really hoping it improves.

View all 6 comments. May 21, Alaina rated it liked it Shelves: The Lady of the Rivers was an okay kind of book. However, this book was just an okay kind of beginning to it. Jacquetta of Luxembourg was a pretty interesting character to read about. Well, after so many chapters because the first half of this book was completely boring. Which is why I rated it what I did. It did start to pick up a little bit better after the half way point.. The Lady of the Rivers was written like a diary.

Again, it was mostly boring in my eyes. Probably because I've read some books that were kind of a diary and they were so much better. Maybe it's the whole genre being different than I usually read or just that there's not a lot of information out there about Jacquetta.. When Jacquetta was a young girl she married the duke of Bedford.

From this connection, she was instantly dragged into the war of the roses. Cousins battling against one another for power and land. I didn't really like Jacquetta in the beginning of the book, but once the cousin war and more people were introduced I started to like her a little bit more.

Overall, it was okay. I wish this book was a little bit better so that I could be more excited about diving into the second book but I'll take what I can get at this point. Sep 05, Susan rated it it was ok. Like her daughter Elizabeth, Jacquetta is possessed of supernatural powers. First, I did strongly appreciate one aspect of this novel: Most novels about the Wars of the Roses portray the Woodvilles negatively, to the point of making them into cardboard villains, and it was refreshing to see Gregory take a different tack.

Gregory turns him into a rather pathetic sort who marries pretty young Jacquetta only to make use of her gift of seeing into the future. Margaret of Anjou shows promise when she first appears in the novel, but soon becomes the she-wolf, complete with budding psychotic son, familiar to anyone who's read a lot of Wars of the Roses fiction.

The novel then quickly jumps ahead into the court of the grown Henry VI and his French bride, Margaret of Anjou, whom Jacquetta serves. At this point, Jacquetta is reduced to the role of standing by and shaking her head as Henry and Margaret drag the country into civil war. Except to read the occasional Tarot card and to give Margaret sound advice, which is usually ignored, Jacquetta plays almost a minor role in her own novel.

The writing in this novel simply isn't up to the standard of some of Gregory's earlier efforts. I thoroughly enjoyed The Boleyn Inheritance , especially Katherine Howard's chapters, which I thought caught the voice of the ditzy young queen perfectly.

The first-person present tense here is simply mind-numbing, with needless repetition. Too often, Jacquetta says something, then tells us what she said.

With this missing, the impression as we close the book or turn off the site, in my case is that of a pleasant but rather milquetoast Jacquetta: Wendy the Good Little Witch. I received an electronic review copy of this novel from Net Galley.

Philippa Gregory is another of those historical fiction writers that I believe must have time traveled. Page by page, I was swept back into the world of Lancaster and York. Although The Red Queen and The Kingmaker's Daughter are both tied for first as the faves of this series, I loved the unexplored territory of the life of Jaquetta. Oct 20, Jackleen rated it it was ok. Two and a half stars The Lady of the Rivers follows the story of Jacquetta, the mother of Elizabeth Woodville, who becomes Queen of England , from a privileged child of the family Luxemburg in France, a family descended from the goddess Melusina; through her encounter with Joan of Arc; an early marriage to the Duke of Bedford, regent of France, uncle to King Henry of Lancaster, who exposes her to alchemy and secret books of forbidden knowledge, and subsequently, accusations of witchcraft.

The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels

Upon t Two and a half stars The Lady of the Rivers follows the story of Jacquetta, the mother of Elizabeth Woodville, who becomes Queen of England , from a privileged child of the family Luxemburg in France, a family descended from the goddess Melusina; through her encounter with Joan of Arc; an early marriage to the Duke of Bedford, regent of France, uncle to King Henry of Lancaster, who exposes her to alchemy and secret books of forbidden knowledge, and subsequently, accusations of witchcraft.

Upon the Dukes death, Jacquetta follows her heart and against royal consent, marries Richard Woodville and is banished to the country side, descending from a Duchess to the wife of a squire. When Margaret of Anjou is brought over to England to marry King Henry of Lancaster, Jacquetta, as her relative, is retrieved from the countryside to befriend the new Queen. Jacquetta is soon the constant companion of Queen Margaret and privy to the secrets and intrigues that surround the throne of the unfortunate, King Henry.

Witchcraft, alchemy, being best friends with a much malaligned Queen, this has all the elements to be a great read, but… First, I must tell you that I am a fan of Philippa Gregory as my bookcases will attest. I have almost all her books and the last four are in hardcover. So, as you can imagine, I was shocked when in the midst of The Lady of the Rivers to find myself not enjoying this story very much at all.

Why, I started to wonder. Have I just read too much historical fiction? Have I overloaded on the genre? I had always thought I could read about history, and especially about different view points in history, until, well… my eyes bled. I do not expect historical fiction to be completely accurate, after all the second word in that genre is fiction. And, when you really put your mind to it all history is fiction to a certain extent, as history is the story left behind by the victors or simply by those in power.

It is the propaganda and slander of the day carried forward to the present. So within historical fiction is the opportunity to present another side of the story.

I mistakenly believed that, finally, I would be given the Lancastrian point of view during the war of the roses. With all this history of conquest in England, I do not understand the need for writers to be so protective of the house of York. The house of Lancaster was the ruling house, how is that they were defeated? That story would be well worth reading about. Unfortunately I am still waiting. The underlying theme, or lesson, of The Lady of the Rivers is one of caution for strong women who seek power.

Gregory presents Joan of Arc, who as we all know was burned at the stake, as an example early in the book, of what historically happened to women when they seeked and assumed power during the middle ages. Another example is the sister in law of Jacquetta, Duchess of Gloucester, Eleanor, who married to the Uncle and heir to King Henry of Lancaster, assumes too much power and privilege, and consequently, is accused of witchcraft and sent to convent from which she never leaves.

Jacquetta, herself, with her family history of magic and witchcraft must walk a careful line and avoids being to publically forward in her opinions and actions in order to avoid the scrutiny of the male powers of the time. A small point, the woman on the cover of the book has red coppery coloured hair like Margaret, while Jacquetta is supposed to have had white blond hair which she passed down to her daughter Elizabeth.

So who is this book about? This should be, as framed by Gregory herself, the story of Margaret, a woman fighting to save the throne for her son against the male powers of the time and being beaten down and defamed by those same men who grab the throne and the power of the land for themselves. In, closing, as Jacquetta abandons her friend Margaret for the house of York, so too, does Philippa Gregory abandon a much defamed Queen to the slanders of history. View all 5 comments. Overall I did enjoy this book.

Really enjoying reading Philippa Gregory books,enjoyed Jacquetta and her relationship with the queen. View 2 comments. Oct 07, Kelly Belle of the Literati rated it it was amazing Shelves: I don't need a spell to foresee the future; I am going to make it happen.

While this is the third book in the series I hesitated reading this because I wasn't sure if this particular woman in history would interest me. I read The White Queen, the first b "I put the charm bracelet away in the purse and return it to my jewel case.

Again, loved this book. So I decided to go back and read this one and I cannot understand my hesitation. This book was enthralling!

I have read more books about the Tudors than I care to admit to and am creeping up on that number with this era about the Plantagenets. I also am very hesitant to admit that this family might be stealing the place in my heart that was previously held by the Tudors.

They are slowly but surely surpassing them. This is huge. But anyways, I can understand that this type of writing or book might not appeal to everyone but I absolutely cannot get enough of Gregory's writing. I am obsessed with this entire year time period that she has written about and I devour her books like they're fast paced young adult novels; I just love them.

So back to Jaquetta, her story starts out very interestingly because while in her uncle's keeping they have captured Joan of Arc. Weird, right? This time in her life and seeing Joan's inevitable fate cements her fear of being caught and tried for witchcraft for the rest of her life.

Jaquetta descends from Melusina, the water goddess, and she is blessed or cursed with the Sight. Because of this Jaquetta eventually catches the eye of the Duke of Bedford and he proposes marriage.

He's about two and a half times her age, her at roughly 15, him at almost forty. And while this is not unheard of in these times, his reason for wanting her is. He does not want her as his bedmate, he will not take her virginity, he does not desire to make an heir, instead he wants her pure in order to use her gift to find the Elixir of Life.

He is handsome, strong, courageous, and kind. After her husband's death, and a little trickery, she finally convinces him to marry her. He was worried he was too far beneath her and would be the ruin of her, but alas, true love prevails and with a heavy fine they are left to their devices and a very happy marriage.

The rest of the novel takes us through their lives together which include no less than 12 children, the marriage of Henry VI to Margaret of Anjou, the beginning of the battles of the Cousins' War with Richard, Duke of York, and the eventual demise of Henry and Margaret with the rise of Edward IV of York. I found this all to be disappointing because none of the characters were likable or encouraged support. Imagine a star-studded ensemble cast in a movie but with a terrible plot and poor acting.

That is the best way to describe this book. Sadly, even the proposed highlights were unsatisfying. I have to admit, there were SOME strong points throughout but I have to judge the novel on the whole, and overall, the momentous events covered Hundred Years War, Wars of the Roses were barely even scraped in potential by Gregory.

The Lady of the Rivers is more of a summary of these events or YA novel. Some contradictory points were also evident. Um… sure. Jacquetta surely did in this novel. This bothered me. The end of the book was the best, similarly to how the Battle of Bosworth scene at the end of The Red Queen was surely the highlight and climax. It also set the lead-in to The White Queen quite seamlessly, especially if one would want to re-read it after The Lady of the Rivers.

However, Gregory should have instead transversed this as a novel about Margaret of Anjou, then. I do support the effort, however. Overall, not AS terrible as I suspected but definitely a dummied down version.Of course you wouldnt hear it. All they have to do is to have the courage and the strength to hold them, and John, Duke of Bedford, will see to that. Win The Lady of the Rivers!

I lift my face from the book, my fnger under the illustration of the man peering through the slats of the bathhouse. It is as if her angels held her up, even when she gave herself into their element.

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